October 21, 2021
blues guitar

blues guitar

BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with multi-award winning musician Sue Foley, one of the finest blues and roots artists working today. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Blues interview with Blues guitarist, composer and arranger Nicola Mingo. An interview by email in writing.  JazzBluesNews.com: – First let’s start with where you grew up, and what got ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Mike MacDonald & Tyler Pantlin of Shakey Trill, an original, gutsy and raw blues/folk duo based in Canada How has the Blues and Folk Counterculture influenced ...
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BLUES VIDEOS
Eric Clapton and Peter Frampton – “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” (Crossroads Guitar Festival 2019) Eric Clapton kicked off his Crossroads Guitar Festival at the American Airlines Center ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Clarence Spady, the Pennsylvania guitarist has followed the footsteps of the soul-blues pioneer. How has the Blues and Soul music influenced your views of the world ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with acoustic blues slide guitarist Donna Herula, passion for Deep South and Chicago blues improvisation. How has the Blues and Roots music influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Pennsylvania-based guitarist Jeff Fetterman, delivers the promise to keep the blues alive and well. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with NYC-based Adam Schultz, focuses on jazz and blues guitar, fusing the two genres in his own unique style. How has the music influenced your views of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with singer/songwriter and blues activist, Debbie Bond – inducted into the Alabama Music Hall of Fame. How has the Blues music (and blues people) influenced your views ...
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INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with acclaimed blues-rock guitarist Sean Chambers, one of the finest guitarists in the world right now How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with 4 Hombres & Flowery (Darko Knežević & Iva Ivanisevic), a Bosnia/Herzegovina based Blues Rock band. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with British guitarist/songwriter Ritchie Dave Porter – music from his struggles and life adventures. How do you describe the Ritchie Dave Porter sound and songbook? What characterizes ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
The world’s first “house of blues” is poised to become an official City of Chicago landmark, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced today. The former home of blues legend McKinley ...
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INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with exceptional acoustic guitarist Dik Banovich – Folk Blues drawn from the deepest Roots of the Delta. How has the Blues music influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Mississippi blues artist Chris Gill, has been lighting up stages in the mid-South for over twenty years. How has the Blues (and people of) influenced your ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Florida-based Alex Lopez, an acclaimed musical artist quickly taking the blues/rock scene by storm. How has the Blues and Rock counterculture influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with female blues artist Cathy Grier, plays a fundamental blues style, channeling the great artists of the past. How has the Blues music and activism influenced your ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with guitarist Rich Russman of Shakin’ Woods, a Washington, DC based blues band with funk n’ rock feeling. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Dutch blues guitarist Chris Janssen of Sweet Bourbon – blues, jazz and soul influences with southern-rock style. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
June 18 marks the 50th anniversary of one of the leading American blues music companies. In 2021, it will be 50 years since Alligator Records released their first ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Texas-based multitalented blues musician Sam Barlow, both frontman and session player has spanned a wide array of genres. How has the Blues and Rock n’ Roll ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with Finnish blues singer/guitarist Erja Lyytinen: voted #2 on Total Guitar’s “10 World’s Best Guitarists Now” poll. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views ...
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BLUES VIDEOS
We recorded the song “Stand And Deliver”, the proceeds of which will be transferred to the Lockdown Financial Hardship Fund. Morrison established it to “help musicians struggling financially ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with St. Louis-based Jeremiah Johnson: the voice of Mississippi River blues blending with the struggles of everyday life. How has the Blues, Rock and Roots music influenced ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
Ebo Taylor became one of Ghana’s major prolific musicians in the 1950s and ‘60s, making his signature Ghanaian highlife that influenced the father of afrobeat, Fela Kuti. As ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Texas blues musician Hamilton Loomis: Christmas album “This Season” brings us hope – at a time when it’s needed most. How has the Blues and Rock ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Canadian guitarist Jack de Keyzer, pays tribute to the great blues masters and heroes How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with East Coast guitarist Peter Veteska & Blues Train: steaming full-bore blues, funk, soul and swinging good time music What do you learn about yourself from the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Boris Hrepić Hrepa & Antonija Vrgoč Rola of Sunnysiders: celebrating their 10th anniversary with a new album titled ‘The Bridges’ How has the Blues and Rock ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
Since all of his concerts and tours have been canceled, Joe Bonamassa invites you to an online concert to give fans a chance to hear him during these ...
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BLUES FESTIVALS VIDEOS
September originally set up a program with guests from Australia and the USA in Fiona Boyes and Heather Crosse respectively in addition to good Norwegian names like Steinar ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Canada-based blues musician JW Jones, fresh off the heels of winning “Best Guitarist” at the IBC 2020 released new album. How do you describe your sound, ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Nevada-based blues guitarist Rick Berthod: High energy and soulful blues with Peripheral Visions. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Eric Hughes: embodies the sound of Memphis through his live shows and award-winning recordings. How has the Blues and Soul music influenced your views of the ...
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BLUES VIDEOS
Many blues clubs have not had concerts since the infection control measures were introduced in March, and most of the audience have only seen concerts on digital streaming ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with North Carolina-native singer & guitarist Harvey Dalton Arnold: Passion for the blues How has Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with blues, roots, and rock musician CD Woodbury: Northwest’s best kept secret. How has the Blues and Rock counterculture influenced your views of the world and the ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with UK guitarist Chantel McGregor – the Blues came first, but rock and pop was always waiting on the corner. How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Wayne Nicholson & John Campbelljohn – The Canadian duo keeps the legend of Elmore James alive! How has the Blues and Rock Counterculture influenced your views ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with UK guitarist, Norman Beaker: An ambassador of British blues around the Europe with new album on his belt. How has the Blues n’ Rock Counterculture influenced ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
Lucky Peterson, a keyboardist, guitarist and singer whose blues career kicked off with a novelty hit at age 5, eventually sprawling over dozens of albums and thousands of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with multiple Blues Music Award winner Doug MacLeod – superb songwriting, guitar wizardry, warm soulful vocals. How has the Blues and Roots Counterculture influenced your views of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with Jim Gustin and Truth Jones, firmly establish themselves in the southern California blues scene and share some of the wisdom they have gained on the journey. ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with powerhouse vocalist Hurricane Ruth: new album “GOOD LIFE” will be released on APRIL 17, deeply rooted in traditional blues, but make no mistake, she can rock the house. How has the Blues, Country and Rock Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? They’ve been the soundtrack to my life. They’ve had a profound impact on who I am. I’ve always been a rebel. How do you describe Hurricane Ruth sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? The music I write and perform is a combination of the music I grew up listening to: blues, honky tonk, outlaw, rock, soul/funk, jazz, Dixieland, and big band. I cut my musical teeth on all of these genres. Each one impacted me both creatively, as a songwriter, and stylistically, as a performer. I prefer to crossover many musical boundaries. My creative drive comes from stories/comments from family, friends, and society. It also comes from rhythms and melodies that I hear. Something will resonate with me or sparks in my mind and I have to immediately write it down or sing it into my phone. Are there any memories from “Good Life” studio sessions which you’d like to share? What touched (emotionally) you? Recording the song, Good Life, was very difficult for me. The song is based on a conversation I had with my mother about a year before she passed away. I asked her many deep and pointed questions about her life, what she would have done differently, and if she feared her “judgment day”. During the first pass of recording my vocals, I started thinking about my mom and her passing. I was overcome with emotion. Needless to say, I had to take a break and regroup emotionally before I continued recording my vocal. Which acquaintances have been the most important experiences? What was the best advice anyone ever gave you? I’ve been very blessed to have met some incredible people at my shows. They have become my friends. I’ve received great advice from many different sources. There are a couple of gems that stay with me. My mom told me to, “Fight for your dreams and do what you love.” My dad, who was a fantastic drummer and musician, told me, “Every time you step on a stage, give it your absolute best. Never take it for granted.” Willie Dixon told me, “Hurricane Ruth! That name fits you. Never get rid of it. It’ll serve you well.” What do you miss most nowadays from the blues of past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? I miss the rawness and simplicity of the blues of the past. No trendy labels or boxes(blues rock, country blues, soul blues, gospel blues, etc.) to try and explain what it was. It was simply, the blues. My hope is that it will continue to evolve and grow. What does to be a female artist in a “Man’s World” as James Brown says? What is the status of women in Blues? It is the 21st century, right? It’s unfortunate that we still have to discuss this subject, and yet; here we are. Yes, women still have to elbow their way in for a seat at the music table. Yes, women still hear this comment from festival talent buyers, “Thanks for your interest, but I already have my one female act. I’ll keep you in mind for next year.” Yes, women’s music still is played less frequently on radio stations. Yes, there are still fewer female talent buyers, female owned booking agencies, and female owned management agencies. What are some of the most important lessons you have learned from your experience in music paths? There will always be people who don’t like you or your music. Persevere through the criticism and harsh critique. Diligently practice your craft. Be true to yourself. What is the impact of American Roots music on the socio-cultural implications? How do you want it to affect people? Without American Roots music, there would be no blues music. The blues has given birth to many different genres. It all comes from the same DNA, the same lineage. We are all the same, in that sense. Let’s take a trip with a time machine, so where and why would you really want to go for a whole day? I would love to time travel back to 1967 to the Monterey Pop Festival. I would love to seeJanis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Otis Redding perform. I would also like to time travel back to 1965 Chicago, IL to hear Big Mama Thornton, John Lee Hooker, Willie Dixon, Buddy Guy, and Muddy Waters in one big jam session. I’d love to sit down at a big table with them, have a couple of drinks, and just listen to them talk. Interview by Michael Limnios ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Canadian prolific songwriter/guitarist Adam Karch: his music embodies the spirit of Americana, a hybrid acoustic blues that consists of precise fingerpicking. How has the Blues and Roots music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? The Blues and Roots music have kept me grounded and focused on the simple things in life like good music. It’s a sort of music that stays true to itself and as there is always new music coming out you can still sort of rely on what feeling good blues and Roots music gives you (for me I mean.) I wish I lived in the 40’s and 50’s where things were still a little more simpler and music was appreciated for its simplicity and message. I’ve been introduced too many people and experiences from playing music. It has set me free and gave me meaning to what it’s like to become 100% yourself which I’m still working on. How do you describe your sound, music philosophy and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? The music is essentially guitar and vocals, a very intimate sound where the vocals blend like an extra guitar string. No effects just a rich plug and play kind of sound. As for songwriting, I’m the type who will think about a melody in my head for months and then finally everything will come out within an hour. I’m not the most prolific songwriter but when the idea comes it eventually transforms into a song which I can call my own. Another way I write song is by recovering popular songs and we visiting them with and putting my twist on them as if I wrote them they come completely my song essentially. What do you love most from a solo acoustic performance? What is the hardest part and what are the secrets of? ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
In 2018, Tiger City Jukes filled the big stage at the Artillery Workshop in Horten to the brim when they invited the audience to a full evening of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Canadian acoustic duo Rott’n Dan & Lightnin’ Willy: A music journey through the American south and the first half of the 20th Century, a time capsule ...
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BLUES FESTIVALS VIDEOS
On the weekend of February 14 and 15, 2020, Dag Bergesen hosted the sixth edition of The Little Blues Festival at Madam Felle in Bergen. Helga was a ...
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BLUES FESTIVALS VIDEOS
Rocker George Thorogood and his Destoyers are announced as one of the headliners for this year’s Notodden Festival. This will be his first visit to Norway after playing ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with singer-songwriter, slide guitarist Jim Roberts – his new album “A Month of Sundays” takes us once more down the Blues-Rock-Americana highway from Detroit City south to ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with committed world roots singer-songwriter Bai Kamara Jr. – music with soul, blues, funk, R&B and jazz influences. How has the Blues and Soul music influenced your ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with one of the original blues road warriors, Bill Blue: His new album “The King of Crazy Town” crackles with energy and edgy guitars with authentic and ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with guitarist and songwriter Sid Whelan: NYC based blues-influenced Americana musician with an unapologetically old-school vibe. How has the Blues and Roots music influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? The Blues teaches finding joy and redemption against the odds; in the throes of misery or despair; and in the face of heartbreak and loss. As a person who has struggled against depression since my teen years, not only have the lyrics of the blues often described my condition when I couldn’t find the words myself; they have inspired me to persevere and prevail. Roots music in general teaches doing more with less. The more accomplished we become as musicians, the more tempted we are to get fancy and complicated. That’s not always bad; sometimes there’s a place for that. But usually focusing on roots simplicity is the best course of action. Lastly performing this music has connected me with a vast diversity of people all over the world of hugely different heritages, politics and perspectives. And in this music we’re all finding a common space where we can be enthusiastically human and understanding towards each other. Talk about redemption! How do you describe your sound and songbook? What characterize your music philosophy? When they say “the blues and country had a baby and called it rock n roll” they were literally describing me. My mom introduced me to Johnny Cash, Hank Williams and Hank Snow; my dad introduced me to Ledbelly, Alberta Hunter and Bessie Smith. And I grew up on the Beatles, the Who, Zeppelin, the Clash, Santana, U2 etc… While in college I discovered a passion for African and Caribbean music, which you can hear in the amazing percussion arrangements on my new album, particularly on “The Promise” and “Legba Ain’t no Devil.” With influences from Robert Johnson to Bob Dylan, from Steve Earle to Santana, I call my overall musical sound “Dark Blue Americana.” The truth is that my guitar sound is confounding. Usually guitarists have an identifiable sound. Think BB King, SRV, EVH, Wes Montgomery; Pete Johnson, Elizabeth Cotten… I take a completely different approach. What all the session guitarists did for David Bowie, Joan Armatrading, and/or Steely Dan in a diversity of approaches for their recordings over the years is what I do for myself on a per-song basis. So, I am like a bunch of session guitarists on my own gig.  This is a hard thing for people to wrap their heads around and probably something no significant blues-associated guitarist has done. On my new album “Waitin’ for Payday,” my co-producer Lora-Faye and I deliberately tried to mitigate that and make it easier on the audience by sticking to one Strat sound and performance approach on the title track, on “Midnight in the Country,” on “the Promise” and on “Break it Down.” But certain songs like “Nina Simone” and “Make Some Time” didn’t work out with that approach and had to be re-recorded, so we’ve still got a diversity of guitar palette that sounds like a few different players. My musical philosophy is to push myself out of my comfort zone with every new project, whether it’s the acoustic guitar chord-solo on “Nina Simone” or the Curtis Mayfield-style head voice on “Legba Ain’t no Devil,” or to write a sentimental love song that melodically centers on the break between my baritone and tenor registers like “Make Some Time.” I always look for something I haven’t done before and which is totally terrifying to attempt (at first.) In my songbook I take structural, harmonic, melodic, groove and lyrical principles from country, blues, rock, soul and jazz standards and creatively re-purpose them into my Dark Blue Americana sound. Are there any memories from gigs, jams, open acts and studio sessions which you’d like to share with us? A few years ago, I did a short solo tour in Ireland. One of the gigs, though open to the public, was at what we would call a middle school in the US. The school takes music very seriously and the kids in the audience were on point. In short order I had them singing along, stamping and clapping in time to songs they had never heard before. It was pure audience participation magic – total euphoria – none of us wanted the show to end. More recently, I played a showcase of regional songwriters at the stunning White Eagle Hall in Jersey City. It was an incredibly diverse and eclectic show with a lot of contemporary styles. When my trio lit into “Every Time I See Her,” which is a finger-picked country blues from my second album, the entire room boiled out onto the dance floor and started boogieing. Once again it was pure euphoria between audience and performers. It was also a tremendous affirmation of both the enduring appeal of that style as well as my band’s ability to perform it. To see singer-songwriters, goths and hip-hop cats dancing together to my neo-retro blues was stunning. Lastly, on my first album I had arranged the song “Dog in the Fight” as a finger-picked mountain minor in dropped D tuning with a chugging train rhythm, like Dolly Parton’s “Jolene.” We were struggling with take after take when the bassist Doug Berns said “this isn’t working; I have an idea.” With no rehearsal he got us to play the tune in a manner that sounds like Miles Davis classic “In a Silent Way.” Everything changed completely including the tuning of the guitar. It was a completely spontaneous unrehearsed performance based on an off-the-cuff suggestion from a hired hand.  As we recorded it, I literally felt like I was floating in space. What do you miss most nowadays from the music of the past? What are your hopes and fears for the future of? The music of the past is still with us so I don’t miss the music itself so much as the loss of the mid-level venues that made it possible for unsigned artists to have a career. That scene is almost extinct now. I recently played at a famous roadhouse in Jersey, where artists like Aretha and SRV used to play. But it was empty: the audience just isn’t there anymore to make it work financially. One of my favorite Jersey venues is going out of business at the end of this month and they were never empty, but even then the numbers didn’t work out. Also, without that circuit it is really hard for ensembles to mesh and develop their group interplay.  So, to my ears ensemble performance quality has declined noticeably in live music. Though there are still shining examples out there like Los Lobos and Tedeschi Trucks where everything from the kick drum to the lead guitar is working together. ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
Christoffer “Kid” Andersen is again nominated for the Blues Music Award as best guitarist. The awards from the American Blues Foundation are the highest award in the international ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Swedish one-person band Bror Gunnar Jansson: unleashes a garage-style hybrid of blues, rock and Americana – songs has taken inspiration from real life crime investigations. How has the Blues and Jazz Counterculture influenced your views of the world and the journeys you’ve taken? Personally/professionally: I believe it has given me the ability to see what is important for me in music and for me as an artist and what success really means to me. There are many ways to view the word success, for many it means that you have money and/or are known, but that is not what it means to me. In my view, success is about being happy (of course) and being able to create what you want to create without someone else telling you how you should do stuff, and being loved for who you are – that is success. Musically: Dynamics and variation. For me it’s very important with variation in music. I quite often hear bands that sound like they’re playing the same song over and over again. Many people seem to enjoy that sorta thing but that’s not for me. I think that maybe I get bored too easily. I grew up listening to a lot of different kinds of music, and went to a lot of concerts from an early age. Especially to a lot of jazz gigs. And I think that really formed me in what I’m looking for when going to live gigs and how I think about performing them myself. Not to be afraid to be daring in music, not to underestimate an audience. Music is very direct, but a lot of music also takes time for people to learn to appreciate. And that’s the case with my music as well, I think. The audience going to my gigs need to concentrate a bit, but if they do, they will get a lot back. What characterize your sound, music philosophy, and songbook? Where does your creative drive come from? Hmmm… Eclecticism. I like to mix styles both musically, sound wise and visually. People often talk about authenticity and about musicians and artists being authentic or not (I am too sometimes being mentioned as very “true” and authentic, but I don’t think I am). Sound: I’m a lover of sounds and textures in sounds. I spend so much time looking for new sounds and working on refining the sounds I already work with and know. It’s like some kind of exploring. Rhythm and groove: Rhythm is really important for me. If music isn’t groovy, I will easily get bored. Creativity: To try to compose, arrange and perform in a creative way. Collage: In many ways my songs are like a collage of music, movies etc. that I enjoy for the moment. I think that I have always been a creative person, with the need of creating and expressing myself in creative ways. When I was little, I expressed myself mainly in paintings and in building Lego, but as I got older, I turned more and more to music. But for me it’s kinda the same thing. I think I create songs and sounds about the same way as I used to create with Lego as a kid. ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS Woman in Jazz & Blues
Interview with Blues/Roots musician and writer, Katy Hobgood Ray: The softer side to the music that comes up from the Delta. How has the Southern Roots music influenced ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with blues guitarist and singer Neil Minet. An interview by email in writing. JazzBluesNews.com: – When you improvise, you know where you’re going. It’s a matter of ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with music writer Tom Hyslop: A veritable encyclopedia of American blues, soul, and roots music – Keeping the Blues Alive and Well. How has the Blues and ...
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BLUES NEWS VIDEOS
Fat Fred and his Possumhunters invited “A Different Christmas” at Lillestrøm Cultural Center on December 12. It was a Thursday, but felt like a Saturday. Enhanced with Viggo ...
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BLUES INTERVIEWS VIDEOS
Interview with Hans Broere: having been in the music business for a quarter century – working as a publicist for a record company and one of Europe’s biggest ...
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